Posts Tagged ‘capital punishment’

Tell me again, why are Breivik and Tarrant still alive?

March 23, 2019

The arguments against capital punishment can generally be classified under the following headings.

  1. Intrinsic value of any human life
  2. Right to life
  3. Wrongful execution of the innocent
  4. Retribution is barbaric
  5. No deterrent
  6. Stooping to the level of the perpetrator
  7. Cruel and inhumane
  8. Unnecessary

They are not convincing in the face of evil.

ktwop:

There have always been situations where killing of some humans has been considered, not just not immoral, but actually a moral duty. To kill people of opposing faiths was justifiable for a long time. To put enemies or sufficiently “bad” people to death was once a moral duty. Even something to be proud of.

It is no different today.

For ISIS and other “terrorist” organisations killing the enemy in particularly brutal ways is something which is not only something to be proud of but also something which opens the gates to Paradise. Armies are trained to, and assessed, by their ability to kill the enemy – in bulk. Collateral damage is regrettable but allowed. It is never immoral. Many states allow individuals to kill when their own survival is threatened. Many other states do not. Many states exercise capital punishment for really “bad” people. Many other states do not and many of these mollycoddle the cancerous humans among them. In more “liberal” quarters the number of euthanasia deaths and abortions carried out have become something to be proud of. Paradoxically, the states which are most opposed to capital punishment are also the states which are most in favour of abortion and the “mercy” killings of the aged or the terminally ill.

There is no such thing as a “human right” to life. Any individual’s life is “cabined, cribbed, confined” by his genes, the privileges accorded by the surrounding society and the quirks of random events.

As with all so-called “human rights”  living is just another privilege.


 

Why is there an ethical problem with capital punishment?

October 31, 2018

There is no problem of ethics involved in destroying cancerous cells in our bodies.

There is no ethical problem in destroying viruses and microbes which threaten disease.

There is no ethical problem in wiping out entire populations of plants and animals which we consider invasive, or threatening to other “native”plants or wildlife, even if humans are not directly threatened.

There is no ethical problem in killing any animal for food.

There is no ethical problem in culling animals – of any non-human species – if we believe their numbers are excessive.

There is no ethical problem in putting down domesticated but unwanted pets.

There is no ethical problem in police forces killing in performance of their duties.- as a last resort – perpetrators of crime.

There is – apparently – no ethical problem any longer in killing, or helping to kill, those elderly who are suffering great pain and have no quality of life remaining.

There is no longer an ethical problem – so the consensus goes – in the on-demand killing of unborn fetuses less than about 20 weeks old.

There is no ethical problem in soldiers of your own country killing soldiers of the enemy in times of conflict.

Why then, should there be any ethical problem in executing a German nurse who has confessed to killing over 100 patients while they were in intensive care? Or in executing an Anders Behring Breivik who glories in the 77 people he killed? Or executing Robert Bowers who killed 11 at a Pittsburgh synagogue?

The real point of capital punishment is not as a deterrent or as revenge or as redemption, but just the simple excision of a cancerous individual from the body politic.


 

Is capital punishment being applied (unofficially) in the UK?

January 30, 2016

Daniel Pelka

A  mother and stepfather were found guilty of the horrific and brutal murder of her 4 year old son. They were both sentenced to serve “at least” 30 years imprisonment in August 2013.

Mariusz Krezolek was convicted of murdering Daniel Pelka alongside his partner Magdelena Luczak, who was the boy’s mother. ….. were both jailed for 30 years in August 2013 after a court heard they subjected Daniel to “unimaginable acts of cruelty and brutality”. ….. Daniel Pelka, whose physical condition was likened by a doctor to that of a concentration camp victim, is alleged to have been deliberately starved over several months.

The mother was found dead in her cell in July last year and had, it was said, “hanged herself”.

Magdelena Luczak: Mother jailed for murdering four-year-old son Daniel Pelka dies in prison

Paramedics attended the 29-year-old’s cell at HMP Foston Hall in Derby at around 7:15am on 14 July. She was pronounced dead at the scene, according to a Ministry of Justice spokesman.

The stepfather, now 36, was found dead in his cell on Wednesday this week

Daniel Pelka: Stepfather Mariusz Krezolek who abused and murdered four-year-old found dead in prison

A Prison Service spokesperson said: “HMP Full Sutton prisoner Mariusz Krezolek was found unresponsive in his cell at 8.30am on Wednesday 28 January. “Staff immediately attempted resuscitation but he was pronounced dead shortly after.

By all accounts they would both have been prime candidates if capital punishment were still in force.

Officially, of course, the UK no longer has capital punishment – even for the most heinous cases.

But deaths while in captivity always carry a trace of a question. Certainly the deaths are very convenient for the UK authorities, both during the custodial period and the period of welfare and social care thereafter. And I can’t help wondering if there couldn’t be just one coincidence too many in this case.


 


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